Category Archives: Trump

Of Protests, Kneeling, and Democracy

A large group of several hundred protesters gathered near the intersection of Edinger and Bristol, at approximately 9:00 p.m. Wednesday night. Protesters gathered to voice their dissent over the election of Donald Trump in Santa Ana early tonight. The protest took a violent turn when protesters began lobbing mortars at officers later in the night. Police used non lethal weapons to control the crowd, who were throwing bottles, mortars, and other objects at officers. Santa Ana PD was assisted by multiple agencies from around Orange County.

You’re one of two people: the man shouting or the man covering his ears.

Everything we’ve achieved in this country resulted from those shouting and seldom from those who seek silence or conformity.

The status quo favors those in the majority, those holding the reins of power, and those with the gold.

Shouts and powerful whispers threaten all three. The shouts aren’t simply demanding more. They demand equality in every respect – and not simply in the material realm, but in the spiritual, and in the minds of men as all of us conduct our daily affairs.

That such an action would threaten democratic ideals instead of reinforcing them is one of the most quixotic and incomprehensible lines of reasoning I’ve ever encountered.

That the majority grumbles in response is one of the most viable signals that words or actions of protest committed peacefully are striking at the heart of their discomfort.

It is only through discomfort that we might collectively agree that we have stepped off the path that should guide us. Democracy is always an uneasy alliance of interests. We should beware of anyone who falsely claims that those who seek change are lesser citizens. These allegations tarnish those making them.

This country belongs to all of us, not just those displaying a glib grasp of patriotism. Those who are shouting are doing us and democracy a great service, even if we find ourselves in a position of discomfort.

We are a nation of better ideas. Let’s hear them and those who aren’t satisfied with where we are.

Despite my fair skin and privileged life, I tend to find myself leaning to hear the words of those who are kneeling, shouting, or trying to tell us something. It’s the least I can do, literally. Learning and growth only occur through challenging all our supposed truths.

Charlottesville Is Us

I take exception to the idea that the racists in Virginia were an anomaly. They are not unusual examples of ignorance – they are typical. These are our fellow citizens. They listen and watch, waiting for the moment which allows them to vent their anger on others. They often are garbage workers, but they are equally likely to be police, teachers, nurses, lawyers, or writers. People don’t answer the call to racism through logic. Likewise, condemnation of their beliefs often serves to galvanize their legitimacy.

We can look to Virginia and shake our heads, wondering what stupidity brought them to that place. While we are doing that, though, there are people around us secretly wishing they could be there in solidarity, shouting out their agreement. Even if it seems odd to some, there are people who think that being white somehow is a matter of pride, as if skin color is a determinate of anything substantive as a human being.

You don’t want to believe that people you know harbor such hatred in their hearts. They do, though, even as they continue to beguile you into complacency after you see a symptom of their ignorance and raise a red flag. Those who subversively conceal their true feelings of superiority toward minorities, other religions and races surround you, waiting. They’re disgusted that they can’t be true to their anger. The internal monologue in their heads has played so long that they can’t distinguish their prejudice from reality. If they live in a place where there is a cluster of like-minded small-minded people, they learn to push the boundaries of acceptability more often. If you are playing the banjo in a room full of banjos, you don’t look so unusual, but if you are playing the only banjo in a room full of cellos, you are the only person getting attention.

Sometimes racists gather in groups and act out. Mostly, they lash out in a million small ways, often indirectly observed. They gaslight you, innocently insisting, “I’m not a racist.” After repeated protests, they get angrier, turning the accusations against you. What they really want is to say, “So what? I am better than those people.” They know they can’t, though. Many use their intelligence to change the nature of truth, often at risk of your sanity. They have lengthy and complicated arguments they repeat endlessly. The signs are there; they grumble about foreigners, language, or convolute the nature of the Civil War, drop small comments about the real story of the Jews, or simply defend their ignorance as tradition or heritage. They point to Chicago as proof of inferiority or refuse to see the difference between Black Lives Matter and hate groups. They say they don’t have a problem with interracial marriage, but… Many have blacks or minorities in their social and business circles which camouflage them. If you are tuned in, your instincts invariably give you pause with most of them.

I grew up around a lot of racists. The dangerous ones aren’t the ones who distract you by gathering in noisy groups in other states. This isn’t a “there” problem. The dangerous ones are the ones you see at the supermarket, at your kid’s Friday night football game, or posting vaguely disconcerting insinuations on social media. They excuse away their particular racism by implying that everyone is a racist or that their version is indeed rooted in truth. They smile, year after year, falsely believing that much of the world reflects how they think. They know that hissing the “N” word will immediately identify their ignorance, so they artfully step around it, learning the nuances of language and presentation which will continue to allow them to live among us without being outed.

So, as time passes, you drop your guard, never imagining that the racism you’ve incrementally witnessed belies a deep vein of actual hatred in your friend or family member’s heart. Most of the time, you give them the benefit of the doubt simply because they haven’t overtly acted out.

People proudly look in the mirror, admiring the skin color they didn’t choose. They go to religious services their parents chose and tend to live in the same places. Their success or failure in life is based on privilege that’s invisible to them. Most get truly angry even at the mention of the word “privilege.” Many focus on what they feel is being “taken” from them as if their claim to anything is greater than anyone else in this country.

Only racists will read my words and get angry.

Only people who know that my words apply to them will recoil in protest. I’m simply inexpertly pointing out that racists aren’t solely a problem outside of our orbit. It’s possible for someone to trigger your instincts toward identifying them as prejudiced and yet be in complete disagreement with racist attitudes. It’s possible to be a Trump voter and not condone racism or violence. You can have issues with Black Lives Matter and not be a racist, too. Or want immigration control and seek to have English be a required language in public commerce. I’m not saying otherwise, though racists will focus on small perceived discrepancies and exaggerate what I’ve said. It’s what they do, instead of honestly admitting their prejudices.

Racists despise the people among them who recognize the signs of what truly echoes in their minds and hearts.

Those people in Virginia aren’t an isolated example: they are us.

It gives you comfort to believe in the best in people – and it should. But never doubt that for every racist holding a sign and grimacing in anger at a protest, there are several sitting at home, nodding their head in agreement. The ones shouting are doing us a favor by identifying their prejudice. The quiet ones, though, they are an almost insurmountable battle. They are the breeding ground for racism’s ongoing prominence.

 

 

Dinosaurians and Trump

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Many of us share moments, some sublime, some perplexing.

Recently, a respected member of the community invited me to his house for lunch and a bit of jawing. (I know what you’re thinking – he couldn’t be illustrious if he were having me over at his house unless a lost bet was involved.)

One of the great stories he told me was about one of his neighbors. My friend told me that this neighbor knew how to build a car from scratch, plumb a house, wire an entire building, and seemed to know a little about every subject on the planet. My friend had always thought of him as a very smart, capable person.

…Until one fateful day when his neighbor extemporaneously deviated off the normal course of conversation and insisted that the world was only a few thousand years old. My friend is an elder statesman with a wide education, has traveled all over the world, served in the military and worked in a career helping people his entire life – so he’s been around the widest assortment of humans you can imagine. To say that he was flummoxed insufficiently describes the shock of the revelation that his neighbor is a “Dinosaurian,” one of the people who ascribe to the variety of nonsense that humans roamed the earth with Dinosaurs or that the planet is actually very young. Most of the people who believe such things are religious fundamentalists, but some are simply like the Flat-Earthers, cherry-picking whatever conspiracy theory fits their ideas.

Afterward, it seemed as if everything were about his neighbor’s insistence that the planet wasn’t ancient. No matter what the subject might be, my friend either couldn’t get the nonsense of his neighbor’s belief out of his head or his neighbor, previously silent on the issue, seemed to harp on and on about nothing else, as if mentioning it just once opened an invisible floodgate to his nonsensical ideas.

My friend told me that story to underscore the continuing amazement he has toward those who chose Trump as their president- or who continue to defend his actions now that he’s assaulted facts, news organizations, religions, and rational public discourse. Keep in mind, my friend is decades older than me. He also voted Republican all his life, even though he was more progressive than the party itself. He, of course, didn’t vote for Trump in the last election. He couldn’t have imagined voting for Clinton, but he knew a vote for anyone but the major candidates was a vote for Trump, having lived through several election cycles which were disrupted by left-field contenders.

Until this election, he could imagine that the choice wasn’t so grotesque as to be an apocalyptic choice either way. When he thinks of intelligent people voting for Trump, he imagines an army comprised of people like his neighbor, snidely ignoring the mountain of evidence at their disposal. He knows that reason didn’t bring most of them to their decision, even though they’ll insist otherwise. He watches as those who should know better fan the flame of prejudice toward other religions, something he’s observed go terribly wrong in other places all over the world. He’s seen how effective such fear mongering can be in a population. Watching people lose their insurance in the midst of so much concentrated wealth also should be sending a red flag to those in power, in his opinion.

For my friend, he holds out hope that the younger generation will continue to advance the progress we’ve made as a society, one dedicated to helping one another; being smarter, more compassionate and better human beings. He knows that people who voted Trump are either a bump in the road and soon to be passed over by time – or the warning bell for civilized, rational society. He’s not at all confident that we won’t descend into authoritarianism or some hybrid religious state.

 

 

 

Speak Up, Mr. Ex-President

Speak Up, Mr. Ex-President or forever will hold your peace.

In my opinion, Obama was the embodiment of intelligence and professionalism as president. Many have expressed displeasure toward those supporters who see reason to criticize him for not putting on his cape, ignoring tradition, and wading into the current political mess swirling around Trump and congress.

The point of this commentary isn’t whether I liked Obama or not – and certainly not whether you did. (I listened to 8 years of mostly nonsense about why many of you hated Obama.) It’s about the disagreement of what a respected opinion should do in the face of strange and exotic circumstances, despite tradition.

I’ve seen some complicated verbal slap fights on social media, with some bellowing that others “shouldn’t” judge Obama for staying out of the fray. I agree with the spirit of those arguments. It’s Obama’s life to do exactly as he sees fit, especially since part of the gentleman’s agreement with ex-presidents is that they refrain from immersion in politics following their terms. There are benefits to our republic from doing so. But…

The truth, though, is that an ex-president never really has complete autonomy after serving: his life becomes entwined with the persona and duties of a figurehead. It’s part of the reason we provide immediate retirement benefits to our presidents. Traditions that served us well sometimes still continue to serve us, while others, including the expectations of diminished public interaction following a term, do not. Your voice is most useful when you’ve got the most to say.

Even though I agree that it is his life to do as he sees fit and that there are benefits to an ex-president giving a grace period to his voice in society, I strongly disagree that Obama is doing us any favors by being mostly silent on current events. If you have a respected voice and intimate working knowledge of the government, this is a skill that has real value on a day-to-day basis. Obama was president for 8 years and strictly speaking, knows more about the job that any other living person. His words – and silence – carry weight.

Obama does tweet, but carefully avoids public displays of criticism. His silence about current events is a disservice to us. If he sees that things are being done which violate the principles of the office of the presidency, he should confidently explain to us why. If he feels that the current president is wrongly stepping into affairs, he should say so. It is everyone’s choice to either heed his voice or ignore it. He has the right to use his pulpit in the manner he sees fit. His ability to exercise his right should be no more diminished than any other private citizen. He should wield his voice precisely because it is his to yield.

Trump placed dynamite on the old political establishment. Regardless of his term of office, Trump has voided many of the previous expectations of the presidency. If Obama is concerned, he needs to voice those concerns. Playing the game under an out-dated set of rules doesn’t help anyone.

It’s easy to believe that our republic will withstand the onslaught recently brought to it, in part because so far, it has done so. We compare Trump to Nixon, as if Nixon had so violently turned politics on its head. This is a foolish argument, given that Trump’s rise was considered a laughable impossibility until recently. Trump usurped both the GOP and Christians evangelicals, rejecting the traditional path and behaviors of both. The form that the presidency will take after Trump is seriously in question. Democrats quibble over who the party leader should be while their most respected voice sits mostly in silence, surrounded by incredulous people eagerly waiting to pass him the ball.

If Obama ever had a cape, he needs to fling it capriciously around his shoulders and start using his voice in the wilderness. His power rests in his skill as a trusted voice. Regardless of history, when people see silence in the wake of DJ Trump, it tends to dishearten those waiting for someone of stature to join them in condemnation of what Trump is doing to the country and to our collective intelligence.

We don’t need a grace period of silence in this country. We need Obama to put on his cape and grab the microphone now, as events unfold. Waiting until something has broken is a violation of our trust. I don’t want to know Obama’s opinion on smaller events if he isn’t going to share his experience, ideas and opinions on those things most on our mind as progressives. It’s his right to do exactly what he pleases. But if our places were switched, I would use each minute of my day to shout to all those people like me.

All of us collectively look at Trump and know that we are seeing something different, with wildly new unspoken rules. We need to stop thinking of these changes as temporary. We need new ways of keeping our country on course. Silence, even from ex-presidents with well-deserved vacation time in their pockets, is worse than nothing. Thanks, and my apologies for any poorly-executed explanations.

Trump Post: Don’t Read Unless You Are Crazy

CLICK HERE FOR TRUMP45 GIF

 

Edit: Oops. NSFW. This gif image is satire, over-the-top absolute stupidity, designed to exaggerate the absurdity of Trump’s image makeover. I know that DJ Trump isn’t Hitler: Hitler’s dead. But I noticed that only 2 little bars need to be moved in the #45 to make the most well-known of hate symbols in the history of man. (I will probably get a call from Pence, angry to be left out.)

Notwithstanding reality, just as the 45 can be easily morphed into a hate symbol, the ease into which we can slide into anarchy or worse becomes more apparent. People tire of all the arguing and shouting; many fail to appreciate that this shouting is what protects us from forgetting our shared goals and to ensure we are checking the direction of our boat. We’re going to always bicker and argue, sometimes at great volume. With Trump, he plays the role of teenager, arguing with great bellicosity at each imagined slight. We can’t tell how serious he is being until after he demonstrates it through action. Like last night, he can be calm. Some of us, however, are assuming he’s about to send us a text message to kiss his ass again, once we’ve angered him. On a sidenote, when people stop voicing their disagreement or anger, you probably have a much worse problem on your hands – you haven’t obtained agreement, you’ve obtained a rattlesnake in your bed, one which no longer gives a warning by way of rattle.

One of Trump’s biggest millstones is his prejudice problem. For his fans, there isn’t a problem: most see his speech as vaguely echoing their own ideas, or being grossly exaggerated by some. (This is a disparity for another day and another argument.) His hiring and appointing of people with serious issues regarding racism and prejudice doesn’t deter his followers from feeling vindicated. For them, it is a change both long-anticipated and worthy of celebration. It falsely seems as if most of Trump’s followers truly wish to echo words of hatred – and I do not believe this to be true. Most are centrist in attitude and compassionate toward other people, otherwise, our country would already be a loss to us all. I know personally so few people who would express hatred toward Muslims or wish to kick out all Latinos, no matter what their immigration status. I do know, some, I admit, but I hate it when I lose focus on the actual slim quantity of such people. Just as some conservatives see only lefties shouting into their granola bags, I sometimes let my eyeballs get the better of me despite working hard to consume a wide array of media.

Only Trump truly knows what it is in his heart. The accumulation of what he has said and done speaks to his innermost self, in my opinion. I would enjoy no greater pleasure than to witness him coming to the realization that courting such anger and racism has generated more of the same. I was raised in a cauldron of hate speech – and each person involved had convinced themselves that such prejudice was both earned and factual – or that it didn’t really mean anything. Everyone on the giving end of such racism tends to fail to appreciate the consequences of exclusion. I, of course, often found myself at the end of the stick if I challenged prejudice even in its mildest forms.

As president, Trump could use his power to speak frankly while unilaterally avoiding stoking the crazies into falsely believing that most of America wishes to calmly allow an ongoing slide into outright and direct racism. He will fail to make America great if he fails to get out of this racism and prejudice pit, real or imagined. Of what point is a country with economic expansion if we turn away from being better? The ideals we claim as a nation cannot be reconciled with the perception of exclusion that much of Trump’s actions have generated. If George W. Bush has some words of admonition for you, there is a great chance that you might be doing some things wrong and some wrong things in the process.

So many people are simply sick of seeing Trump on the news, reading about him on social media, and discussing him across the walls of their cubicles. All of us, regardless of politics, want to see an absence of allegations of hate and insult.

To date, the resistance has done a passable job of shouting back at Trump. I still find it difficult to believe that Trump himself can be as aggravatingly prejudiced as he sometimes seems. On the other hand, I was completely wrong about so many people I grew up with too, people who were otherwise rational and giving but who turned into venom-spewing adults who could find no fault with their attitudes about any combination of LGBTQ, Latinos, Jews, or any other group with less political power.

If you’ll forgive me for shocking your eyeballs with an absurd swastika, I’ll forget that you wanted me to listen to Trump’s speech last night and then ignore the totality of everything he had done.

PS: As with so many of political posts, this one will be reported to FB as hate speech, which would be ironic; expected, but ironic. I didn’t use the swastika lightly or with malice, although it might seem to be the case. Satire demands an ember in the eye sometimes.

A Few Words About Tom Cotton and Immigration

As you read these words, please remember that I’m a liberal, the kind that Tom Cotton would like to invite to Guantanamo Bay for an unplanned vacation.

Several days ago, I wrote about progressives failing to understand the fight about the Department of Education. Northwest Arkansas residents heard first-hand from Senator Tom Cotton last night that he still strongly desires to break the Dept. of Education. I’m certain that this will happen, absent a huge change in government in the next year.(Although, as one of my friends told Tom Cotton in the Town Hall last night, it’s difficult to trust the State of Arkansas to do the right thing, given we had to have the federal government come in with troops simply to integrate our schools.)

Today, I’d like to offer a few words about immigration, ones which will be music to conservative ears.

Tom Cotton has positioned himself to take over the work of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Tom is staunchly conservative and will continue to carry the torch for conservatism in the senate. He has already sponsored immigration legislation under the Trump administration. I’m certain he will insist on strong immigration action in the next few years. He has connections in the military, congress, the intelligence community, and the new administration. He’s been clear about his views on almost all the immigration arguments. For him, they boil down to security and economy, which are two of the GOP’s most important themes.

Absent a miraculous bolt of lightning from the heavens, those who disagree with the GOP and Senator Cotton have a painful road of incremental losses ahead of them. Cotton wants to reduce legal immigration and to remove all undocumented foreigners, including Dreamers/DACA. He’s got a Harvard education and a head for logistics. He artfully argues away the statistics showing the benefits of a foreign workforce. In his mind, his views are justified and supported by his voters. Senator Cotton does not hold his views on immigration loosely or lightly – they define his worldview. Being reasonable won’t work to change his mind – but then again, neither will shouting at him.

I predict that some of the attempts to implement immigration action will be stymied by cost and the courts. Much of it, however, will pass scrutiny and occur to varying degrees. The courts will step out of the way once the administration sharpens its overly-broad attempts to shape policy.

Given that NWA has a large population of Latinos, I predict that Senator Cotton will use his pull in the administration to orchestrate one of the first waves of ICE sweeps in our corner of the state. It will not only serve his penchant for retribution for the ocean of protest he was handed last night, but it will be a cost-effective publicity-fueled way to kick off the effort.

In short, Senator Tom Cotton will use his considerable intelligence and pull to target the Springdale area first. Having observed him, I see that he knows trying to ease into such an effort will cause a greater resistance effort than simply striking hard and first where much of the resistance has grown.

As satisfying as it was last night to see Senator Cotton be told the harsh realities of those he disagrees with, I can see the coming backlash already forming.

We can’t rely on public sentiment to dissuade such an effort. The truth is that many citizens want absolute control of our borders and of who is allowed to stay here. We have underestimated the sentiment of branding undocumented foreigners as criminals who should suffer the consequences of being here without permission. Most will not join the shouts of protest as people we know are dragged away. It’s a hard thing to say, but I can see it coming.

Tom Cotton is going to be that firebrand who will not be afraid to step into the fight and deliver action. We can angrily thank Donald Trump for liberating people like Senator Cotton.

I can see all these things because although I disagree with much of Tom Cotton’s agenda, he has consistently held firm to his ideals as the country has shifted to meet him in the middle. Just as we looked away for a moment as the country elected Donald John Trump, I am certain that we’ve also looked away just long enough to miss the subtle change in commitment from the GOP to finally take decisive immigration action.

We are going to suffer and it is best if we prepare for it.

Trump’s Omen

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In honesty, I made this with great care, not even intending to insult or ridicule. It’s a portent and omen of our misguided belief that we can use anger and fear to change anything, no matter how broken, into something positive.

If you look in the center, you can see another face apart from Trump, representing the untamed thing that Trump birthed during his campaign. He is merely the figurehead, having tapped into an ancient fear of the ‘other.’ It’s not Trump nor Trump ‘the man’ per se which will be our challenge – it is the valve he opened into people’s hearts. We can only hope that we can navigate the murkiness that could envelop all of us.

Populists are dangerous for specific reasons, tending to overtake the ideas they originally espouse.

Rising rivers seldom take heed of what’s in their paths – and collectively, we are capable of much harm to one another.

A Long List of Crazy!

A joke to open this list of craziness:

I think that Mike Pence’s office just trolled me.

The phone rang and I reluctantly answered.

“Is this X Teri?” It was a man’s voice, full of authority.

“Yes, yes it is,” I answered, waiting to hear what was being sold.

“Are you interested in making some money, sir?” He sounded serious.

“Uh… yes, I am. What do I have to do?” I was halfway sold by this point.

“X, ignorance has went up $50 a barrel and we’d like to pay for drilling rights to your head.”

After that, the call went dead. I could swear I heard a faint laugh, though.
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“It’s only natural that we’ll have a super-moon tonight; the electoral college just chose the biggest ass to represent us.” – X
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Julia, my mother-in-law, had hair that was in such a bad shape that when she accidentally got lost in the dog show, her hair won “Best in Poodle.”
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They asked me to be nice and to turn down the snark. Evidently, they now believe in “TURN-THE-OTHER-TONGUE-IN-CHEEK.”
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“If you listen closely to people, you’ll have a headache.” – X
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It’s strange that we went from fact-checking to ad-libbing to now decrying that every opinion is equally valid.
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There are some who say the election was basically Ford Vs. Chevy, which is bizarre to me. I’ve never seen a Ford that insisted on electroshock therapy to take the gay away or one which refuses to start if you’re Muslim.
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Imagine if American Indians had passed better Immigration Laws, especially in regards to orange people. – X
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Regarding Roundabouts: Only in America will people complain that driving in a circle is too hard – and then do everything to prove it.
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I tried to get excited about high school football because I misunderstood the altitude adjective to mean something entirely different.
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The Durden Potts Rule: word diarrhea rarely amplifies the point or improves the reputation of the person making it.
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While I am generalizing, I’ve noticed that most people who blame racism on the media also tend to be the same subset of people who are likely racist.
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The guy who posted it said he wasn’t being racist – but he insisted the Obama Presidency should be called “The Dark Age.” He literally is blind to the fact of how it sounds. But evidently not colorblind.
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According to Stan Lee, there is 20% chance that Trump is merely a super villain, trying to coax out Superman.
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For the 10 people in the United States who watch “Poldark” on PBS, it’s weird how in the UK Ross raped Elizabeth in the book and in the TV show, but it was completely removed for the U.S. edition. I was certain that the Trump candidacy removed that sort of consideration from our collective conscience.
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Now, instead, we must follow the Golden Drool.
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Apparently, this country is suddenly so white that even Team Edward thinks we’re all vampires. Weirdly, though, it’s eggshell white, because a lot of people are walking on them the last few days.
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Make no mistake, to get where you are right now, you had to shut an infinite number of doors, each an unchosen or rejected possibility.
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The pastor is so hateful toward liberals he wouldn’t even allow a donkey in the nativity scene.

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Many pundits speculate that Trump appealed to some because the dummies were tired of being made fun on. Maybe if they didn’t spend recess sewing Confederate flags, they wouldn’t get ridiculed. Does this comment help any?
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I am going to miss being able to buy black licorice.
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I’m starting a chain of addiction centers for masochists: they are MisTreatment Centers.
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We need a huge wall built, that’s true. Just not for the reasons the Trumpettes think. I’m hoping a town on the Mexican side re-names their town “New Berlin,” for the historical impact, later, when the wall of course comes down.
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The election was a type of Heavenly GPS – because a lot of people gave me directions on how to go directly to Hell.
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My wife and I were speeding past concrete lane blockers on the interstate. “I don’t like this wall,” my wife nervously commented. “Imagine how the Latinos feel, honey,” I replied.
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“People are always talking about ‘in the eyes of god,’ as if anyone should be so arrogant as to claim to know anything, much less what god wants or doesn’t want. Great people violently disagree about what god is saying.” -The Old Man Chronicles
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On a friend’s FB wall recently, she posted about peace and civility. Every single person on her page commenting was someone I had unfriended at least once for being the exact opposite of a good human being. I had to laugh. Being an outsider grants perspective that dogma doesn’t.

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Are you in the house of god or is the house of god in you?
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As for excusing away social injustice: It ain’t called “whitewash” for no reason.
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There’s nothing like sports analogies to remind people that even if you get the most points, somehow you not only lose, you get kicked off the team and deported.
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“My ignorance has just as much right to be here as your knowledge.” -overheard 67 times this week – at least that’s what Google Translate told me when I pasted the ignorance others wrote, for clarification. It kept switching the preferred language from “English” to “Trump,” though.
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“Religion? It could be the best thing in the world! For too many, though, it’s just a word to let them judge you and tell you what to do. Religion lets you reach a conclusion without having to work for it. If you have a religious idea which allows you to treat someone in a way you wouldn’t want for yourself, that’s delusion, not religion.” –The Old Man Chronicles
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“You Are Not Stuck In Traffic. You Are Traffic” It’s a cool way to say you are part of the problem, no matter how much you deny it. I think the same goes for those people who complain about the state of the current political process. They don’t even see that they are the ones driving, banging on the steering wheel, wondering why so many people are frozen in front of them.
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Trump inauguration song lyric: “Tonight we’re gonna party like it’s 1959.”
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I knew that church wasn’t for me when I noticed a skull and crossbones above the door.
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Trump was asked what was his favorite golden oldies song is. Without hesitation he replied, “(David) Duke of Earl.”
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New Education Slogan: A nation doing long division cannot stand.
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Weirdly enough, the Election Commission invited Trump’s team to help count votes. They quit after 15 minutes, however, because they ran out of available fingers to do the tabulation.
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So many complain on social media about participation trophies instead of clear winners and losers. Yet, that is exactly what Donald Trump got on election night. He came in second but got the trophy anyway , all because the United States used to believe that slavery and owning other people was a really neat idea.
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“You can spend your life arguing about what your book means. But be humble, nice, compassionate, love as many people as you can. Doing life that way will get you further than all the ‘things you are sure of’ will ever get you. You can’t be a great person by focusing on being right. ” –The Old Man Chronicles

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Isn’t it strange that a residual effect of slavery (the Electoral College) took the election from the majority who wanted to carry on the legacy of the first black president by electing the first woman?
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Trump has a lot in common with immigrants. He’s going to be our (p)resident alien.
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The term ‘casual homophobia,’ much like the term ‘business casual,’ is code for ‘no one can be comfortable.’
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I wonder how it would have went if Hillary Clinton had captured the illustrious KKK endorsement.
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Why is it that we can watch movies like “Next of Kin” wherein a dead person’s family will avenge a death at any cost, including driving a thousand miles, walking through Kentucky swamps, and breaking every law on the books, but somehow we don’t see the connection when we are dropping bombs overseas.
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Of all my social media friends, most people complaining about peaceful protests after the election are white folks. And most of them were horrified of Obama in 2009. Of course most of them aren’t racists. Enough are, however, to risk getting painted with the same brush.
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On someone’s post, I wrote: “White people tend to worry about broken windows. Minorities tend to worry about broken heads.” It was wildly unpopular with the average Trump voter.
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For everyone in Springdale or NWA who ‘likes’ the “Live Springdale” page, many of you don’t know that the page is operated by an ultra-conservative who endorses only the right-wing candidates and ideas. It’s his page, of course, but it is certainly not something he advertises. It’ll save you some forehead-slapping if you recognize this now.
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According to many, god once commanded us to treat people of other colors as inferior. It is an easy thing to return to such nonsense – especially when the people around you are endorsing it.
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Dear Mr. Grandma: That’s how I started my congratulations letter to Trump.
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If the spurs jangle, then you are wearing boots.
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It’s reported that Mike Pence watched “Mississippi Burning” to learn more about race relations- until someone pointed out it was supposed to be a negative example rather than a blueprint.
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In a successful effort to disprove his own point, he started his defense by saying, “I’m no racist, but…”
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There are many people who will tell you “Hello, jerk!” and then protest when you complain, by defending themselves with the comment, “… but I said hello.”
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I’m not a Democrat or Republican: I’m liberal. I’m more liberal than anyone you can imagine, in part because I can be swayed by new information. The past isn’t an anchor that obligates me to try to impose it on a new world.
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It’s true, you should show Trump/Pence the same respect Obama’s haters gave him for 8 years. It’s only fair.
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Every time Trump mistreats someone, a reporter in San Diego would call and ask, “What motivated you to say that?” Trump would grumble and say, “The Golden Rule, of course. All my bigly moves are based on that. I’m a Christian, you know. I have a plaque in each of my offices to remind me. Mike Huckabee made them for me.”

Even after mocking the disabled reporter, Trump preemptively called the San Diego guy and said, “The Golden Rule guided me.”

4 years later, the San Diego reported got arrested and dragged to Trump’s headquarters and was thrown into a chair inside Trump’s private office.

The reporter laughed to himself as he looked up above Trump’s mantle, to the infamous “Golden Rule” plaque that had guided Trump all these years.

“Do unto others as you would do to your shelf.”
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Yet another goofy joke…

“I am the best at fast calculations,” Trump tells an advisor.

“OK, what is 888 time 438 divided by 5?”

“29!” Trump states.

“Ha ha, that’s wrong!”

“Might be, but it was fast!”

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Words have power. Many people asked me yesterday , “Why do you care? You’re not gay, Muslim, or any of those things which TP’s policies will harm. Shut up!”

I’ve noticed that anyone can get on ‘the list.’ Whether it is religion, sexual orientation or commitment to free expresion , you never know when your opinion might be unpopular. History has shown us that all significant changes start as radical ideas until they are suddenly accepted.

Because of words spoken during the campaign many Americans are scared of what the future will bring. I am fortunate enough to know that these concerns are both authentic and capable of being reality.

They look around to see their friends, family, and fellow Americans cheering the fact that we are rolling back humanity’s collective conscience.

Today it is ‘them.’ Tomorrow, who knows? I’m with them today, in the off chance I’ll be them tomorrow.

I don’t protest or seek to disrupt because I know that the same power of words which permit Trump to scare the country also allow me to be a part of the brighter future.

It’s so strange to see white heterosexual people with names like ‘Smith’ post that there’s nothing to worry about – that the election was just a choice, that the sun will still rise tomorrow, that America will not change for the worst. Being a white man is in itself a type of racism-proof vest. And few of them seem to understand that they are wearing one. -x

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911 system mysteriously overloaded today as nation collectively and subconsciously calls for help. Busy signal received. – X

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Pence, riding on the coattails of Trump’s surprise election, today announced that his new anti-LGBTQ initiative will outlaw actual rainbows. – X

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Even George Washington couldn’t resist editorializing today as Obama met with the 4th Horseman.

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The entire country is in a collective episode of “What Would You Do?” And some of us are going to have a really bad after interview trying to explain what in the heck we were doing.

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This time, I decided to do all the graphics work myself, little by little. I had a 16 X 20 wrapped canvas made and framed to my specifications, using my artwork, and including a questionable quote from “Breaking Bad,” one of the best TV shows to ever ponder the duality of mankind’s nature. (Thus the black/white, nature vs. nurture theme of my work.) It turned out beyond my expectations. My wife loved the look, but immediately noted the usage of the word ‘bastard’ in this context.

As for me, I think many of us are going to be introspective in the future, cautiously anticipating the potential expression of our lesser natures.

Love, X

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